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Home > Nepal > Trekking > What is Trekking ?
A Trek is Not a Climbing Trip
Whether you begin your trek at a roadhead or fly into a remote mountain airstrip, a large part of it will be in the Middle Hills region at elevations between 500 and 3000 metres. In this region, there are always well-developed trails through villages and across mountain passes. Even at high altitudes there are intermittent settlements used during summer by shepherds, so the trails, though often indistinct, are always there. You can easily travel on any trail without the aid of ropes or mountaineering skills. There are rare occasions when there is snow on the trail, and on some high passes it might be necessary to place a safety line for your companions or porters if there is deep snow. Still, alpine techniques are almost never used on a traditional trek. Anyone who has walked extensively in the mountains has all the skills necessary for an extended trek in Nepal. Though some treks venture near glaciers, and even cross the foot of them, most treks do not allow the fulfilment of any Himalayan mountaineering ambitions.

Nepal's mountaineering regulations allow trekkers to climb 18 specified peaks with a minimum of formality, but you must still make a few advance arrangements for such climbs. Many agents offer so-called climbing treks which include the ascent of one of these peaks as a feature of the trek. There are a few peaks that, under ideal conditions, are within the resources of individual trekkers. A climb can be arranged in Kathmandu if conditions are right, but a climb of one of the more difficult peaks should be planned well in advance.
A Trek Requires Physical Effort
A trek is physically demanding because of its length and the almost unbelievable changes in elevation. During the 300-km trek from Jiri to Everest base camp and return, for example, the trail gains and loses more than 9000 metres of elevation during many steep ascents and descents. On most treks, the daily gain is less than 800 metres in about 15 km, though ascents of as much as 1200 metres are possible on some days. You can always take plenty of time during the day to cover this distance, so the physical exertion, though quite strenuous at times, is not sustained. You also can stop frequently and take plenty of time for rest. Probably the only physical problem that may make a trek impossible is a history of knee problems on descents. In Nepal the descents are long, steep and unrelenting.

There is hardly a level stretch of trail in the entire country. If you are an experienced walker and often hike 15 km a day with a pack, a trek should prove no difficulty. You will be pleasantly surprised at how easy the hiking can be if you only carry a light backpack and do not have to worry about meal preparation. Previous experience in hiking and living outdoors is, however, helpful as you make plans for your trek. The first night of a month-long trip is too late to discover that you do not like to sleep in a sleeping bag. Mountaineering experience is not necessary, but you must enjoy walking.
Nepal Trekking Regions
Annapurna Region TrekkingAnnapurna Region Trekking
Annapurna Himal and the town of Pokhara dominate Annapurna area. There are three major trekking routes in this region to Jomsom, to Annapurna sanctuary and Annapurna circuit and Pokhara is also a good starting trek for a number of short treks like Siklis, coca cola treks and Royal treks in Annapurna region. View More
Everest Region TrekkingEverest Region Trekking
The Khumbu or Everest region is the most popular trekking area in Nepal. It would probably be the most popular destination, but it is more difficult to get to Solu Khumbu than to the Annapurna area. To get near Everest, you must either walk for 10 days or fly to Lukla, a remote mountain airstrip where flights are notoriously unreliable. View More
Central Region TrekkingCentral Region Trekking
The central region north of Kathmandu offers a multitude of trekking destinations, all accessible without flights. The three major areas are Langtang, Gosainkund and Helambu, which can be combined in many different ways to make treks from seven to 16 days long. Langtang is a narrow valley that lies just south of the Tibetan border. View More
Western Region TrekkingWestern Region Trekking
Manay people describe western region as "unexplored", but Westerners have a bad habit of assuming that what is unknown to them is unknown to everyone. The region accounts for about 68% of the total land area. It is formed by the Mahabharat range that soars up to 4,877m View More